YOU OR A FAMILY MEMBER MIGHT BE AT INCREASED RISK FOR HEREDITARY CANCER (BREAST,  OVARIAN, COLON, ENDOMETRIAL, PANCREATIC AND PROSTATE ) WITH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FAMILY HISTORY FACTORS.

IF YOU MEET ONE OR MORE OF THESE RISK FACTORS, YOU SHOULD TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR OR SEEK GENETIC COUNSELING. YOU CAN FIND A CERTIFIED GENETIC COUNSELOR AND LEARN MORE ABOUT GENETIC COUNSELING THROUGH THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF GENETIC COUNSELORS.

RISK FACTORS

  • Known mutation in a gene that increases cancer risk
  • Breast or colon cancer at or before age of 50
  • Triple-negative breast cancer at or before age 60
  • Two breast cancer diagnosis (either in the same breast or in both breasts, but not a recurrence or spreading of the first cancer)
  • More than one primary cancer in the same person, especially those related by the same gene
  • Ovarian, fallopian or primary peritoneal cancer at any age
  • Male breast cancer at any age
  • Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancer at any age
  • Three or more of the following cancers within the same genetic line in a family, especially if any were diagnosed before age 50: Pancreatic, Prostate (Especially Gleason stage 7 or higher, metastatic), Melanoma, Sarcoma, Adrenal, Brain tumors, Leukemia, Uterine, Thyroid, Kidney, Diffuse Gastric, Colon, Breast

cancer risk assessment appointment

Should you need to consult with a Genetic Counselor, you will need to take family history information with you. For more information, click here.

More details about BRCA1 and BRCA2 and cancer risk are available through the National Cancer Institute.



Ovarian Cancer Warning Signs and Symptoms are often unnoticed and overlooked.

Ovarian cancer often goes undetected because the symptoms mimic numerous other very common conditions such as digestive and bladder problems. Also, while pap smears can detect cervical cancer, they cannot detect ovarian cancer, and even the most thorough gynecological exam often misses its presence. That is why it is so important for women to know the symptoms of ovarian cancer, so that they can detect ovarian cancer at an early, more treatable stage.

The symptoms of ovarian cancer tend to be persistent and worsen over time. Make an appointment with your doctor if you experience any of the following for a few weeks or more:
• Abdominal pressure, fullness, swelling or bloating
• Pelvic discomfort or pain
• Persistent indigestion, gas or nausea
• Changes in bowel habits, such as constipation
• Changes in bladder habits, such as frequent need to urinate
• Loss of appetite or quickly feeling full
• Increase abdominal girth or clothes fitting tighter around the waist
• Persistent lack of energy
• Low back pain

Breast Cancer Warning Signs and Symptoms. It is encouraging that survival rates are increasing, but there is still no cure.

Breast cancer is the second-most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States (behind skin cancer). What many don’t know, is that it can affect men, too. Both women and men can carry the gene mutation that increases a person’s risk of breast or ovarian cancer.

Breast cancer symptoms often include:
• A lump, hard knot or thickening in the breast or underarm that feels different from the surrounding tissue
• Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening
• Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
• Change in the size or shape of the breast
• Pulling in (inversion) of the nipple or other parts of the breast
• Peeling, scaling or flaking of the nipple or breast skin
• Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
• Dimpling or puckering of the skin of the breast
• New pain in one spot that doesn’t go away

Talk to your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms, find a lump of any size or experience other discharge from the breast. Seek genetic counseling if breast cancer runs in your family.

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